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Legendary boxer exposes himself to embarrassment with his insistence not to get out of the ring

Legendary boxer exposes himself to embarrassment with his insistence not to get out of the ring

After a lackluster press conference to sell a fight where everyone imagined the predictable outcome, Roy Jones Jr. (64-9, 46 KO) ended with a phrase that saved the morning from boredom, along with a Rafael nod. Palmeiro: “I’m going to take you to school.”
His victim on duty, the now-forgotten Glen Kelly, uttered every bravado that crossed his mind, but those at the now-defunct Bongo’s Cuban Café knew he had no chance against the pound-for-pound best fighter in the world.
That happened on January 30, 2002, as a prelude to the victory that occurred on February 2 at the American Airlines Arena, days when Roy Jones Jr. seemed eternal, fireproof, for the best reasons and you are not in that he walks his worn anatomy and his diminished abilities by quadrilaterals of fourth category.
I remember it because it was my first world title fight and I had heard about Jones Jr. in Cuba as if he were a venerable ghost, the quintessence of boxing, boxing itself.
Long before Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao began to dominate the fisting landscape, Jones Jr. was the man, the alpha and the omega of the ring, the iconic figure of the American quarry, the one who carried each and every one of his rivals to school. The owner of titles in four divisions. (Courtesy El Nuevo Herald)

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